IDFA MEETS NOUR MAGAZINE

NM & IDFA

For IDFA 2021, Nour Magazine will be curating “IDFA Meets Nour Magazine”, at Podium Mozaïek (Amsterdam)  dedicated to shedding light on the Arts and Cultures of the Middle East and North Africa. 

This event explores MENA culture through Morocco’s cinematic ways—a sincere representation and conversation on culture, people, and life. In dedication to Moroccan cinema, the program kicks off with the film Before the Dying of the Light by Ali Essafi, followed by a panel discussions with curator and researchers Fatima-Zahra Lakrissa and Maud Houssais, Shasha Movies programmer Bella Barkett, and records archivist Disco Arabesquo. As the next step in the journey, an exhibition will take place in the cafe area with four contemporary artists who explore identity in its rawest form, accompanied by a live DJ set by Disco Arabesquo.

The interactive space will give way to discussions with guest speakers, artists, curators, and contributors involved in the event. As a way to travel and see fragments of the region’s arts and cultures, these artists show a glimpse into people and cultures, one that truly contributes to the region’s identity.

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Date: Wednesday, November 24, 2021
Program starts: 20:00

Location: Podium Mozaïek (Bos en Lommerweg 191)
Spoken language: English

GET A TICKET HERE

Moroccan culture in the 1970s posed many questions of defining identity through arts, in particular through cinema, music and fine arts. This quest for a unique representation of the country, in a way that came from the people to the people, is one aspect that makes up the particular and influence of these times. 

SCREENING

Before the Dying of the Light, Ali Esafi (2020)

This glittering collage of posters, magazine covers, archive footage, jazz music, and cartoons takes you back to the art scene of 1970s Morocco, viewed from the perspective of the artists and actors themselves. Many of them were to end up in prison or disappear without a trace. The story revolves around a Moroccan independent film from 1974, About Some Meaningless Events by Mostafa Derkaoui, where a group of young filmmakers explored the role the new Moroccan cinema should play in society. The counterculture arose from Marxist student movements which saw cinema as an “instrument for sensitization” and self-discovery. After just a single public screening, About Some Meaningless Events was censored by the government. But the negatives of this long-lost film were rediscovered in Spain and have recently been restored.

GUEST SPEAKERS

Fatima-Zahra Lakrissa: Moroccan based researcher and curator, and current resident to School of Casablanca initiative will discuss the importance of the 60s and 70s in Morocco, the influences of the Casablanca art school’s ways on the country’s perception of identity (and more)

Bella Barkett: Shasha movies co-founder, Habibi Collective and Nour Magazine contributor will dive into the importance of archiving in a digital age through her work as a researcher and curator for Shasha movies.

Moataz Rageb: records and cassettes archivist of the MENA region for Disco Arabesquo will present his practice and invite us to join the exhibition space for live performance revolving around Moroccan and Maghrebi sounds of the 60s and 70s. 

FILM

Before the Dying of the Light by Ali Esafi (2020) is a glittering collage of posters, magazine covers, archive footage, jazz music, and cartoons that takes you back to the art scene of 1970s Morocco, viewed from the perspective of the artists and actors themselves. Many of them were to end up in prison or disappear without a trace. The story revolves around a Moroccan independent film from 1974, About Some Meaningless Events by Mostafa Derkaoui, where a group of young filmmakers explored the role the new Moroccan cinema should play in society. The counterculture arose from Marxist student movements which saw cinema as an “instrument for sensitization” and self-discovery. After just a single public screening, however, About Some Meaningless Events was censored by the government. But the negatives of this long-lost film were rediscovered in Spain and have recently been restored.

See the trailer.

In line with Nour Magazine’s mission, this hybrid exhibition and music set presents artists that represent the cultural and artistic diversity of the region. Curated by Nour Magazine with a scenography by Carlyn Edenne, and hated at Podium Mozaiek, it takes you through Lebanon, Turkey, the Netherlands, Morocco and Jordan and beyond, along with the artists, their work, interviews and more to be expected. 

ARTISTS

Disco Arabesquo: Disco Arabesquo is a collector of Arabic art, cassette-tape digger/connoisseur, selector & DJ. He digitizes songs from cassette-tapes, remasters them and dj’s with songs that are almost forgotten. He specializes in Arabic-Western cross-over sounds that portray ‘a splash of civilizations’ and a creative generation searching for a new identity.

Minem Sezgin: In her graphic novel “No Seat At The Table”, Minem Sezgin asks: What defines a City? Is it its buildings, public spaces or people? 

No Seat At The Table is a fictional graphic novel about the local and global influences of gentrification on citizens in Turkish and Dutch cities. The book highlights four neighbourhoods where this phenomenon is occurring: Piyalepaşa in Istanbul, Ismetpaşa in Ankara, De Kolenkitbuurt in Amsterdam, and Lombok in Utrecht. Each story is told from the perspective of pigeons and inspired by real life experiences of residential displacement in Turkey and the Netherlands.

RENSKE DIKS

Muhcine Ennou: In his work of photographs, Muhcine Ennou seeks to explore the subtleties of everyday life. The interest of sociology and ethnography play a key part in his artistic practice of capturing these socio-cultural nuances. Muhcine is fascinated that cultural meaning remains open-ended and polysemous. Traveling to and participating in different cultures is a crucial activity which allows him to construct his frame of reference for interpretation.

Bayas: Pottery artist Saya Berzinji, known under Bayas, is fascinated by the four natural elements that are needed in the process of making ceramics: earth, water, air and fire. Earth and water are mixed and delicately formed into the most beautiful shapes while air and fire hardens the objects and brings out the incredible colours of the clay and glazes used. She combines her love for the colours, shapes and patterns found while traveling and living in the Middle East alongside her passion for crafting vessels out of clay.

SCENOGRAPHER

Carlyn Eden: Carlyn (from Paris) is studying Architectural design at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie, specializing in Scenography. To her, scenography is a mediation tool, a frame to the actor’s performance, a stage to the artist’s work and the body’s interactions within and with space — an intellectual and sensory experience. Her work process engages with different aspects of scenography, from set design and installations to exhibition design, using writing, material study, lighting, audio visual production, sculpture and drawing as her main mediums.